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How To Haggle At A Pawn Shop

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updated: 12.9.2015

2 minute read

 

“What’s the bottom dollar on this item?”
“How low can you go on this?”
“What’s the least you would take for this?”
Being able to ‘haggle’ a little on the price of an item is one of the many perks of shopping at a pawn shop. Everyone loves to get a good deal and we want everyone to be able to! So… In the spirit of ‘haggling’, here are 3 tips that will help you get the best price when buying an item from a pawn shop!
Tip #1: Make a reasonable offer.
One of the worst things you can do when bargaining for a better deal is to start with an unreasonably low offer. Take in consideration that the pawn shop purchased this item in an attempt to make a profit. Throwing out a low ball offer could ruin the process from the get-go. Of course you want to start out lower than what you would actually pay for the item, but your offer should be high enough to be taken seriously!
Tip #2: Bring Cash!
Cash is king! This is true almost everywhere you shop, and pawn shops are no exception to this rule.
Do we take debit and credit cards? Of course we do! We’re certainly not against it either and will gladly accept it as a form of payment. However, when bargaining for a better deal, you stand a MUCH better chance of closing when you have cash in hand!
Here’s why.
When you use a debit or credit card to pay for your merchandise, the store you are shopping at is charged a certain percentage for each and every swipe. This is one reason why bargaining with cash can help you land a better deal. If you pay with cash, the pawn shop won’t have to pay the fee, and instead can pass the savings along to you, the customer!
One more thing. When you start the bargaining process, and you’ve named your price, take your cash out and lay it on the table! People have an emotional attachment to cash. When the seller sees the money laying on the table, it’s almost too good to resist!